History of the Brazos

At 840 miles, The Brazos River is the longest river in the State of Texas. It flows from Llano Estacado in New Mexico to Freeport Texas

The Brazos River Basin encompasses almost 45,000 Square miles or about 1/6 of the state of Texas.

Every drop of rain that falls within this watershed is either consumed by flora and fauna, evaporates or flows down the mighty Brazos.

Historic Richmond Crests

 Railroad Bridge at Richmond, 1899

Railroad Bridge at Richmond, 1899

ABOVE 50' MAJOR FLOOD STAGE'

61.2 ft Dec 10, 1913

58.6 ft July 1899

54.74 ft on 06/02/2016

50.30 ft on 10/21/1994

ABOVE 48' MODERATE FLOOD STAGE

49.97 ft on 06/03/2015

49.80 ft on 01/01/1992

49.67 ft on 04/21/2016

  Railroad Bridge at Richmond, 1899

Railroad Bridge at Richmond, 1899

ABOVE 45' FLOOD STAGE

47.38 ft on 03/01/1992

47.15 ft on 01/31/1992

47.08 ft on 10/22/1998

 Brazos River Flood, Sugar Land Texas Dec 10 1913

Brazos River Flood, Sugar Land Texas Dec 10 1913

46.10 ft on 02/10/1992

Historical Flood Timeline

1833 Major flooding occurs and the Brazos River leaves its banks from Washington to Ringold's Prairie (near present-day Navasota).

1842 Major flooding occurs and Brazos leaves its banks from Washington to Navasota and widens the river to six miles or more for an extended distance.

 Flood Scene Richmond Dec 9 1913

Flood Scene Richmond Dec 9 1913

1899 Between June 17 and June 28, 1899, rainfall averaging 8.9 inches fell over 66,000 square miles, causing the Brazos River to overflow its banks and inundate an estimated 12,000 square miles. Damage to property was estimated at more than $9 million and 284 persons were known to have perished in the floodwaters; thousands of others were left homeless. The flood's highest recorded stage was at Hearne, where, as at many points, the waters rose above all available flood gauges.

1913 The Guadalupe, Colorado, Brazos and Trinity Rivers all leave their banks to flood more than 3,000 square miles of land, killing at least 177 people and causing $3.5 million in damage in the Brazos Valley. The flood causes the Brazos River to permanently change course, now exiting near Freeport.

1921 Major flooding drowns at least 224 and brings destruction to Central Brazos Valley of greater magnitude than previously experienced. The state responds with the creation of the Brazos River Authority.

1991 Major floods occur in the central part of the Brazos River basin due to recurring thunderstorms.

1995 Major flooding occurs in the central part of the Brazos River basin due to recurring thunderstorms.

1998 Tropical Storm Charley affected the Lower Brazos River watershed. A major flood event occurs in Central Texas after 30 inches of rainfall in a few hours. The Little River experiences the fifth largest discharge in its history. Flooding also occurs in the South Fork San Gabriel watershed, and the Mill Creek watershed. Property damage of $750 million and 29 deaths were reported primarily in the Colorado and Guadalupe river basins.

2016 Texas was doused with more than 35 trillion gallons of rain in May 2016. Twenty percent of Fort Bend County is under water, hundreds of homes inundated, tens of thousands of residents displaced, and dozens of roads are closed. River crests at historic 54.8 ft at Richmond.